Undue Influence Can Taint The Validity Of A Will

Creating a will allows for an individual to generously pass on their assets. When there is a sizable estate involved, however, inheritance shares can become points of contention for beneficiaries. In some cases, an heir may even take it upon themselves to sway a family member's estate planning decisions through deceit and other unsavory tactics.

Such actions are considered undue influence. When proven in court, undue influence can void a will. If you suspect that a loved one's will does not reflect their actual desires, a Haddonfield law firm like ours at Ritigstein Law may be able to help.

Potential Grounds For Contesting A Will

In the state of New Jersey, a party providing undue influence can be cause to challenge a will. This requires proving that the will's testator was vulnerable to manipulation due to their mental, physical or economic state. Some examples of undue influence can include:

  • An individual's caretaker preying on their dependence and seeking a large share of their estate
  • A testator's children being edged out of their will at the recommendation of a spouse
  • Another party participating too closely in the drafting of a will, offering input that serves their best interests

Undue influence can happen in a variety of ways, but it typically manifests as the surprising allocation of certain sums. A lawyer who is well-versed in this segment of estate litigation — such as ours at Ritigstein Law — may be able to help you recognize the signs of undue influence in a loved one's will.

We Can Help You Seek What Is Rightfully Yours

To speak with an attorney regarding undue influence, will contests or other estate litigation matters, contact us today. You can fill out our contact form to schedule a free 30-minute consultation regarding your case. We are also available by phone at 856-375-1473.