Holding Administrators, Executors And Other Fiduciaries Accountable

A breach of fiduciary duty takes place when a fiduciary fails to act in the best interests of the heirs or beneficiaries of an estate or trust. If your inheritance is threatened by actions taken by an administrator, executor, guardian or person holding a power of attorney, an experienced attorney can help you explore your legal options.

A Breach Can Unfold In Several Ways

Though a fiduciary is often appointed with the best intentions, they may fail to act in accordance with their duties. This may transpire in the failure to keep beneficiaries adequately abreast of the probate process, or in some instances, more egregious transgressions. Examples of breaches of fiduciary duty can include:

  • Self-dealing: The act of managing an estate or trust to benefit one's self is a glaring breach of fiduciary duty.
  • Mishandling assets: Decisions must be made that serve the best interests of the beneficiaries, and all creditors must be paid on schedule.
  • Embezzlement: Misappropriating or stealing assets is an act of financial fraud.
  • Commingling of assets: If an individual blends the assets of an estate with their own —without the power of attorney to do so — they are not adhering to their fiduciary obligations and may be committing a crime.

If you suspect that a fiduciary is not acting in the best interests of your family member's estate, our lawyers can help. At Ritigstein Law, we work with clients throughout New Jersey with their estate litigation needs, and we would be privileged to assess your case.

Learn More About Our Legal Services Today

Our attorneys are ready to start working for you. To arrange for your free 30-minute consultation, call Ritigstein Law today at 856-375-1473. You can also contact our firm via email and one of our representatives will provide you with a response within 24 hours. Our law office is in Haddonfield.